About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN2 17
CSPAN 10
KQED (PBS) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WETA 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make the same mistake again, america. that's why it had to come out before the election. it's a book about racism, and to my critics chagrin, i'm against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it, and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70s and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next case, treated in the media, suddenly the clan took over the new york city police force apparently. one of my -- it's hard to describe the beginnings because there's the brawl and various race hoaxes, and much like the trayvon martin case, they disappeared once the facts came out. you never get that final article saying, attention, readers, that story we've been his hysterica
for a civil rights leader who made a very controversial comment. was campaigning for president obama at a church in georgia paturday...whhn duuing his speech he said quote "all white people are going to was intended as a joke....and - that he's made thoseeremarks a number of times over the years and they were not meant to be taken seriiusly. "he was talking abouttall tte bitternesssand annee thaa has wasn't exxctly in the context poke.""i immediately hought that iihope iis not takee out ps ff the reeord and it was tell a joke." wassabout to &pjoke."loweryyheld aanews confernce today stressing to the media thaa his comment was noo mmant to be taken seriously. bad day or a woman whh made a thousand dollar tyyo wwile payyng a ill online. pdbra tupperrwas paying her dollars and 69 cents. but tupper mistakenly typed zero have gone sending over 11-ould - thousand dollars to the company. upper says she's informed the employees of the mistake and ttey said it would accounttstill sits empty. "i have nn money in my accoontss i'm getting overdrafts, i can't pay anyyof &pmy biils, i got
with the actual history of civil rights in america. and it was great because they believe everything the new york times believes. at least the girls on the view would argue with me. one sentence summary of my book, and don't make the same mistake america. liberals have been the primary practitioners 7. every police shooting, suddenly the klan had taken of the new york city police force. like the trade on martin case, they disappear once the facts come out. the story we were hysterical about, you would know -- the black kid was -- did ambush and killing a cop, only because the stories would disappear from the news. one of the best ones was michael stewart who came to be called an artist because he was caught spraying graffiti in the subway. a dozen cops, they got him to the hospital two weeks later and he passed out and the revived demand and he was at a coma and died of pneumonia. he died as a result of police brutality despite medical examiner's saying the opposite. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter. they are acquitted and the new york times editorial the next day was remembering michae
of them before i left. will i realize people who familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america who read my book notice that they haven't read the book but that was great because they believe everything "the new york times" believes that "the new york times" doesn't argue with me. at least the gals on the few would argue with me. the one sentence summary of my book is, white skills have never produced anything good and don't make the same mistake again america. that is why it hasn't come out before the election. hits a book about racism and to my critics chagrin i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70's and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next mattel case and that is how what was treated in the media. suddenly the klan has taken over new york city police force. there are vignettes of various race hoaxes and much like the trayvon martin case, they all just disappear once the facts came out. you would never guess that this final article. atte
, the economy, and civil rights. >> also the rights of women especially remain in question. the problem has been highlighted by a recent rate case -- rape case. >> the case has attracted intense scrutiny in tunisia. a young woman has accused two policemen of rape. they are under investigation, and her complaint led to a countercharge. the state prosecutor has accused her of indecent behavior. for many here, the case is a backward step for women's rights in post-revolution tunisia. this case is important for all tunisian women, and things are especially bad for women who are victims of violence. many will be too scared to press charges. this woman provides advice to victims of domestic violence at the office of tunisian association of democratic women. she says more and more women are coming to her since the revolution. women are developing the courage to seek help, but she says many men are abusing their newfound freedoms. >> women tell us what their husbands are saying to them. the men say they can do what they want and as soon they will have the right to have four wives. >> tunisian is changin
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
these issues, we're integrated. it's all integrated. it's economic, it's social, it's our civil rights. i think women take a different view. as sandra was saying, though, there is that gap between married women and what i prefer to say as unmarried women other than single women. some of us are a little older and not married. there's 52 million unmarried women. they break overwhelmingly for president obama. so i do think that in these broader numbers, some of those distinctions get lost and most important group for president obama, black women voted for him. >> right, who are the single largest group in terms of turnout in 2008. victoria, i was wondering a little bit about this idea of what does it take to create a multi-racial cross class, close enter generational women's coalition? on the one hand, we're not all the same. having ovaries or at one point having ovaries, not even get spoog the biology of it all. but that alone doesn't give you shared political interests, but it is sometimes surprising to see how different those opinions are depending on what sort of woman we're talking about. >>
? >> i think social issues do mean a great deal to us. when you look at guy marriage as the next civil rights issue of our time. we were seeing if he would take the next step and make it a federal law. when i travel around the country at the end of the day, it is everyone talking about back pocket, money, jobs, employment. >> let's talk about you're talking about pocketbook, talking about economic issues. when you look at the youth vote today, since you've been talking to them, are they more fiscally conservative than perhaps last election, seeing many of them as children of generation x-ers. that generation grew up fiscally challenged and they may have passed some of those ideas to their children. >> that taps into something, yeah. i agree with that. i authentic it explains that we have this sort of entrepreneurial spirit. when i travel around the country, i say what do you want to do when you grow up? a lot of the students i talk to aren't interested -- they are, but they don't talk about being the next lebron james or laid a gaga. they say i would love to be the next steve jobs. it'
. ♪ >> bret: now some fresh pickings from the political grapevine. civil rights icon who gave benediction at president obama inauguration says he believes all white people are going tohill. 91-year-old reverend joseph laurie told a group of obama supporters in georgia he is frightened by the level of hatred and bitterness coming out of the election. monroe county reporter writes "laurie said when he was a young militant he used to say all white folks were going to hell. then he mellowed and just said most of them were. now he said he is back to where he was." laurie attacked those black georgians who did not vote in the 2008 election. and criticized the national anthem as too militaristic. lowery is expected to give a news conference on the topic on friday. >>> who women in dominican republic claim new jersey democratic senator menendez paid them for sex. they told the "daily caller" senator agreed to pay them $500 apiece and only paid them $100. menendez tells geraldo rivera that story is false, absolutely false and contrived. finally, if you have noticed, a lot more jokes about romney t
's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> this is fox 5 news at 10:00. >>> d.c. mayor vincent gray is announcing big changes to speed camera fines which many drivers feel are excessive. here's the breakdown of the proposed changes. if you're going 10 miles over, the final drop from 75 to 50 bucks, 11 to 15 miles over the limit, fines will drop from 125 bucks to 100 bucks. if you're caught driving 25 miles per hour over the speed limit, the fine goes up 250 to $300. this change comes as city council considers a plan that would slash fines even more. fox 5's matt ackland has this story. >> with a council committee ready to take on those high speed camera fines next monday, mayor gray unveiled his own plan. >> we continue to work on this up through including yesterday and we are ready to announce the direction that we are going to be pursuing. >> under a plan proposed by council members mary cheh and tommy wells basically all speed camera fines would be lowered to 50 buck
1964 civil rights act also prohibited employment discrimination on the basis of sex and that included pay. and basically the equal pay act hasn't been updated since then. so let's fast forward a minute to lily led better. the name that i know many of you are familiar with. and she had brought a lawsuit. she was in alabama working for almost 20 years at good yeer tire and rubber company. she learned from an anonymous note that that as one of very few women who held a particular position, she had been paid less than every other man in this position, including ones who were younger and had started way later on the job. she was disappointed and infuriated by the news. there was a policy that employees could not discuss pay amongst themselves, so she did not know until she got that an anonymous note. and when she learned about the years that she had been paid less, and the implications, because it may start small, but then when you think, over time, wage increases are often percentage increases of your salary. pension contributions are based on your salary. when you add a
but it is not even. here's the figure i want you to consider. from the u.s. civil rights commission which analyzed the in the dumpster, the ballots that were cast, if you are african-american, the chance of your ballot will get spoiled is 900% higher than if you are a white voter. that ain't no accident. it's an apartheid vote counting system we have in america. we are back to jim crow. not jim crow, it stopped or james crow systems analyst. that is how it is working. that is the new gimmick we are trying, that is happening and that is where the monies being spent and that's what makes the data trust dangerous. if they want to use it to pick out people who bowl and say bowlers made paul ryan fine but what if you are doing is mailing letters to soldiers on active duty with the game of challenging them, that is a crime according to bobby kennedy. and i have to say, while al gore grabbed his ankles in 2000 after he read, personally read my story that was breaking in england. this was before the supreme court ruled that thousands of like people were banished from the voter rolls in florida and after j
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
the first railroads were build in new york state, the first rail line was laid right parallel to the canal, and later, the first interstate west through new york was laid right next to the railroad, and it was not until really after the civil war that the amount of freight carried by railroads exceeded the amount of freight carried by the erie canal and other canals. >> i've got a follow-up question to that actually, you know, are there any bits of the erie canal operational today for commerce rather than historical republicans? >> right. , i think i mentioned this is the third version. the first was four feet deep, enlargement from the 1830s to the 60s, and then from 1905-1917, the current canal built, a canal for motorized barges. the current canal is essentially much straighter, much, much broader than the original canal, and there is -- i've basketball on the canal, and there's now -- i've been on the canal, and there's not for several decades, no commercial activity. it's entirely pleasure boaters, and there was a brief resurgence in the summer when gas went up to -- when oil prices s
because they've been right at "the new york times" jobs to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. that got me thinking, whose job is at? if it's not going to be the times they are going to shut up private plans, at least sort of a vacuum. i would've thought responsible government would leave that felt by the government as opposed to by law professors and centers for national security. so as i said at the beginning, i do agree with john at the debate is not in any significant regard difference in so far as the tensions from what has been really for the better part of the last seven years. i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability and at least uncomfortable with. and maybe that's just because i'm a law professor who happens to spend time in the trenches like these guys. >> i think it's a little uncomfortable to talk about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has been occurred. the question has been life to the ngos, the think tanks, the press committees are to figure out who exactly is responsib
protect you and me from those who would do us harm, threaten our rights and take away our civil liberties whether they be foreign or domestic, unscrupulous businesses, corporations or individuals. i gained a reputation as a legislator committed to working together. i worked with governor mike leavitt to balance the state budget every single year. collaboration is how problems are solved. as your united states senator, i promise you every day i'll work the represent you -- to represent you and this great state. god bless you. god bless utah, and thank you very much. >> moderator: on behalf of the studio audience, our viewing audience and the citizens of utah, we thank you both for running. [applause] >> that debate between candidates to represent utah in the u.s. senate happened on october 17th. it's one of the dozens of debates we've been bringing you this election season. follow campaign 2012 live on the c-span television networks, c-span radio and c-span.org. you can also find us on twitter and facebook, and we've also been taking a look at some of the swing states in play this election
but i do believe everyone is entitled to rights and that's why i support civil unions. >> moderator: next question to the kingman. >> this keep in via e-mail. how would you restructure the taxes? >> i talked about the need to make our code more simple and fair. we have way to many loopholes taken advantage of because it's school in they have lawyers that find these loopholes. that doesn't mean it's right. even if it's legal, we should change that because it's not helping create jobs. every day i meet with small business owners, and those guys, a lot of them just -- they come fresh from their work. they have oil on them and grease, and they can't afford to hire a whole wing of lawyers to find these loopholes? that's an example. and by the way, jets and oil companies and loopholes that allow companies to write off moving jobs overseas, those are primed to be closed. that helps our small businesses. we can lower rates for our guys and gals and hard-working families. so what i'm for is making sure we execute this process. i have voted to stepped -- extend out the current rates for a yea
bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated the hatred on the left. for the right, it wasn't specifically foreign policy and civil liberties. we have a president is that is not only largely continuing the same foreign policy as its predecessor, but expanding it in ways that the left would not accept. when bush was there, the patriot act, to put people away without due process. obama has said we can imprison american citizens. not just enemy combatants, but citizens. never any questions asked. how do you see with obama now doing bush on things with the continuation of undeclared wars, how do you see foreign policy from a liberal perspective considering that obama has considered so many of his predecessors policies and expand on them. >> obama himself has not interpreted it as saying that we have the right to be maki said that we have the power, but i won't do it. >> i don't think that's quite accurate. it's a very vague sentence in the bill, it said any more power that is specifically about foreign terrorists, that they have the right to take american citizens willy-nilly in
a criminal law and civil law background. he was confident. he had the right work ethic. everything about it was a perfect fit for us. remember, if you have a civil law firm with a contingency fee incentive in a case like that involving a state, you miss issues that are important to the state of alabama. one issue in the bp case, which is critical to state, is that the judge's decision to apply federal maritime law to the penalties that would apply if they recovered as opposed to state penalties. alabama has significant state penalties for these events. the judge decided to go with the federal statute. that's on appeal in the 5th circuit because we feel like in criminal law terms if they manufacture poisen in atlanta, sends it to birmingham to poisen someone, the state has jurisdiction over that. that's a simple analogy, but that's the state criminal law state authority power issue that's at stake in this litigation, and an in-house lawyer who understands that is particularly important in cases like that. the other thing that doug mentioned, and the question was where do you get your info
urges revenge against mitt romney. what happened to civility? we'll be right back. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >> gretchen: welcome back everyone. the presidential election just three days away now. can you imagine that both candidates are going from town to town to town to town in those swing states. what are they saying? remember when president obama talked a lot about civility and how we should all be nice to each other and not really say any words that might be negative. >> steve: how is that working out? >> gretchen: yesterday he used a word that was new to his stump speech. he got boos from the audience when he talked about mitt romney but then he said this. >> at the time the republic congress any senate candidate by the name of mitt rom? i. [boos] >> no, no, no. don't
hope you are right. thank you, sir for joining us live on this saturday morning. >> thanks for having me. >> brian: four minutes until the bottom of the hour. so much for civility on the campaign trail eastward either side. revenge on mitt romney? what revenge? i thought this was their first match. >> steve: she tried to sneak a fast ones at the polls but wound up walking out in handcuffs. what did she do? we got details. >> brian: that hair color looks so natural. ♪ there she goes again. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating fr
in investigating. it's not the "new york times'" job to do the work of human rights and civil liberty groups. that got me thinking. well, then, whose job is it? if it's not the times', and you shut out plaintiffs in the information; that leaves a vacuum, and i thought the responsible thing would be to fill it by the government opposed to law professors and centers for national security. as i said in the beginning, i agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different in as far as the tensions what's been really for the better part of the better part of the last 70 years, but i think that we are leaning more towards a lack of public accountability than i'm comfortable with, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, a law professor not in the trenches like these guys. >> it's uncomfortable to talking about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has not occurred, and the question has been left to the ngos, the think tanks, the press to sort of figure out, well, who exactly is responsible for braining that accou
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and four example would continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond as you see what's going on in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders. that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense. we provide statistical support to all geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key rotary for aviation, information operations, civil affairs, military police come into view defense capabilities. corps of engineers were pretty busy today doing other things. we've critical components of the military space program. for example, were responsible for everything from the satellite to the ground station prevented communication based on elements. a lot of people don
responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the satellite on down to the ground station in providing c
. we can't forget about that. we are responsive and we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provided a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders and that includes intelligence, surveillance recognizance for off the geographical combatant commanders. would provide air and missile defense. geographical combatant commanders provide logistical support for all geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key -- for aviation and information operations civil affairs military police wmd defense capabilities, corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components and military space program. for example we are responsible for everything from the satellite
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
to tolerate it and sort of equated it to the first amendment. that is never going to be my approach to civil liberties or equality. i am proud that we overturned don't ask, don't tell. and yes, marriage and equality is the right thing to do. >> rep wilson? >> the alpha lincolnville that you have sponsored, federal funding from schools, if there is believed in the schools, bullying for any reason is an unacceptable. i think that is best dealt with by teachers and parents and authorities, not by cutting funds from a school if there is bullying going on in the school. that is the position i take. like you, i am a parent. we do not need washington to solve those problems for us. >> rep? >> actually, when congress when wilson was in congress, she helped pass the no child left behind legislation, and it did just that. it took away power from our schools and put it into a one size fits all structure that does not teach new mexico kids. i would repeal the legislation. >> i'm going to do something a little different here, and give each of you a chance for one more were bottle on this issue, starting
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects of the personalities to which you were privy, in particular in your case lbj and some of the dynamics and contradictions in lbj is personality as reflected by the many voices that you have included in this book. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwr
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)